How to Prune Your Roses

pruning roses

Roses are a hardy plant and are often happy to grow undisturbed, so it can be difficult to tell when to prune your roses. However, light pruning at the right time of year helps to promote healthy growth and flowering as well as helping to maintain a sensible size for your rose plant.
To see your beautiful roses effortlessly bloom year after year, it’s best to prune them at the start of each year. But when? and how?

Keep reading this rose pruning guide to find out how and when you should be pruning your roses.

When Should You Prune Your Roses?

single yellow rose after pruning

Your pruning window may be slightly different depending on where you live. For example, if you live in the south, you can get away with pruning in mid-February. If you live further north, you should probably wait until March when the weather is warmer. Pruning can also depend on the type of rose plant.

Rose Shrubs should be well pruned in mid-March in Southern England, or in the second week of April when you get further north.

Climbing Roses shouldn’t be pruned for two years after planting and then only sparsely, removing unnecessary growing tips. It’s best to prune this rose type in autumn.

How to Prune Roses – Best Methods

pruning roses in the garden

For most roses, you can prune in late winter. Take care to remove dead/diseased wood and deadhead faded blooms which can be done with your annual pruning. Cut no more than 5mm above a bud with a clean, sloping cut away from the bud so water cannot gather. Keep your secateurs sharp for a clean cut.

Pruning Tip 💡 – Use fertilizer on your roses once you’ve pruned them to encourage healthy growth throughout the year!

Shop Our Entire Rose Range

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Beginner’s Guide to Starting a Garden

Starting a garden is one of the most rewarding things one can do and anyone do it. From creating a cut flower garden, growing your own sustainable veg patch or planting an amazing border display, getting your hands dirty in the garden has so many benefits, but it can be difficult to know where to start.

Here are our 7 easy steps to guide you through the process of starting your own garden!

1. Make a Plan

First things first, what do you want to grow? A vegetable garden? An herb garden? A flower garden? All of the above? All are great choices but have different maintenance requirements. I’d recommend for all beginners to start small until you know what you’re getting into.

2. Pick the Perfect Spot

Your garden location, soil type, amount of sun exposure and access to water will play a big part in what plants you’ll be able to grow. Most plants, vegetables and fruit thrive in sunny spots but if you garden is shaded for most of the day, there are still plenty of plants (Hostas, Heucheras, Grasses) that can thrive in the shade. Go outside and study your outdoor space, learn about your soil type, and then research which plants would be the best fit.

3. Start the Ground Work

Get rid of the top layer covering the area you plan to plant. If you want quick results (e.g., it’s already spring and you want veggies this summer), cut it out. With a spade, cut the ground into sections to make it easier to remove, then put it on your compost pile to decompose. Now, you have your planting area ready to go!

4. Choose Your Plants

Choose your shopping style. Some gardeners like studying plant catalogues to create their shopping list, others head to the garden centre to select their plants, or you can simply shop online. The key planting seasons are Spring and Autumn, so choose your plants according to their planting times. Summer-flowering bulbs/plants should be planted in the Spring (Dahlias, Begonias, Roses) and Spring-flowering bulbs/plants should be planted in the Autumn (Tulips, Daffodils, Crocus).

5. Hydration is Key

Close care and attention is essential for young plants. Once plants establish a strong root system in the ground (usually a few weeks after planting), they tend to be less needy. After that, how often you need to water depends on your soil, humidity, and rainfall; although once a week is a good place to start.

6. Mulch for Protection

Mulching is life-saving for gardeners. Mulching your plants helps them retain moisture and keep weeds at bay. Cover the soil with a couple of inches of mulch after planting and you won’t have to water as often. Also, by preventing sunlight from hitting the soil, you’ll prevent weeds from forming in your soil.

  • For annuals: Choose a mulch that decomposes in a few months.
  • For perennials: Use a longer-lasting mulch such as bark chips.

7. Care, Grow and Enjoy!

Now that all the planting is done, now is the time to care for your garden and watch it grow.

Don’t forget to keep up with common garden jobs such as:

  • Watering plants regularly. 
  • Pull out any weeds.
  • Prune dead blooms, or leggy growth on plants/shrubs.
  • Remove garden pests (e.g. Aphids) by picking them off the plant, hosing them off with water, or spraying on an insecticidal soap.
  • Support tall plants (e.g., tomatoes) with a trellis, stake or pergola.

Add a Burst of Colour with Calla Lilies

Calla Lilies, also known as Zantedeschia, are beautiful flowers which offer an attractive colour range, are easy to cultivate and are suitable to be grown outdoors or as houseplants inside. These irresistible flowers produce blooms from May all the way through to October, and make excellent cut flowers as they have a long vase life of up to 2 weeks.

Calla Lily Top Picks

Lavender Gem

A stunning lavender-violet Zantedeschia which produces funnel shaped flower heads and glossy foliage.

Morning Sun

Morning Sun is stunning Calla Lily with gradient petals blooming in yellow to pink shades.

Prado

A beautiful deep burgundy red Zantedeschia with sturdy green stems and large glossy speckled leaves.

Elliottiana

This Calla Lily has glorious golden yellow trumpet-shaped flowers which blend into green flecked foliage.

Rehmannii

Rehmannii has creamy blush pink flowers contrasting with lovely green stems for a beautiful floral display.

Flame

These sizzling flowers become less yellow and more orange-red as they age, living up to their Flame name.

Lipstick

This vivid pink Zantedeschia stands out and will be a lovely bright addition to your summer garden.

Black Magic

Contrary to the name, this bright Calla Lily is actually an eye-catching yellow! The zesty flower sits on dark green foliage.

Planting Guide

Zantedeschia grow best in full sun or partial shade and in organically rich, moist, well-drained soil. They are well suited for bog or marsh gardens, for planting near ponds and streams, or as border plants or for containers. When to plant: any time between Feb and June, but only after any danger of frost has passed.

IN THE GROUND

  • Choose a sheltered position and add some well-rotted organic matter before planting.
  • Plant the Zantedeschia tubers 10cm deep and about 30cm apart.
  • Set the tubers with the growing tips facing up. Cover them with soil and water as needed. Mulch to keep down weeds and conserve soil moisture.
  • Provide consistent moisture during the growing season and do not allow the soil to dry out.

IN POTS

  • Calla Lilies can grow as tall as 2 to 4 feet, so a tall, narrow pot is better container than a wide, shallow one.
  • Place the tuber so it is lying horizontally, with the eyes facing upwards.
  • Cover the bulb loosely and give it enough water just to dampen the soil.
  • Set your tall pots in a sunny spot where they will get a bit of shade in the afternoon and fill the saucer under the pot with water.

AFTER CARE

  • Feed with a balanced liquid fertiliser once a month until the flowers have faded.
  • Mulch annually in autumn with well rotted garden compost or manure.
  • Snip off blossoms as they start to fade, using clean and sterilised gardening shears.

Valentine’s Day Flowers to Grow at Home

With Valentine’s Day on the horizon, there are flowers in every shop and supermarket. Why not grow your own for next year? Anyone can grow cut flowers! It’s a personal, economical and rewarding way to show love to your family and friends.

ROSES

Roses are the flower most associated with love and romance. In Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Juliet says to her lover “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” to express that love has no boundaries. The rose has also been England’s national flower since The War of the Roses in the fifteenth century.

Blue Moon

Rose ‘Blue Moon’ is an unusual icy-blue colour and have a lovely fragrance, which makes them an eye-catching addition to bouquets and displays.

Fragrant Delight

This stunning rose is one of the most popular variety of Floribunda! Its blooms are coppery peach-pink blossom in colour and are highly fragrant.

Scarlet Queen Elizabeth

This bold red rose produces glamorous scarlet flowers with a subtle fragrance. The gorgeous red colour is a classic for a Valentine’s bouquet.

DIANTHUS

The name Dianthus comes from the Greek words ‘dios’ (god’) and ‘anthos’ (‘flower’). The common name ‘Carnation’ was derived from the Latin word ‘incarnation’, meaning the incarnation of God. It symbolises admiration, passion, affection, love and gratitude. One of the world’s oldest cultivated flowers, the popularity of Dianthus has remained throughout many centuries.

Doris

This delicate pretty pink flower has a wonderful striped red centre which makes it stand out. Doris has a subtle fragrance and is ideal for a cut flower display.

Scent First Memories

Memories is a beautiful creamy white flower from our ‘Scent First’ range of Dianthus which produce amazingly fragrant flowers.

Valda Wyatt

Our Valda Wyatt produces frilly vibrant pink blooms and have a lovely scent. They make fantastic cut flowers and a bright addition to bouquets.

IRIS

The Iris’s history dates back to Ancient Greek times when the Greek Goddess Iris, the messenger of the gods and the personification of the rainbow, acted as the link between heaven and earth. It was said that the flowers had the power to bring bliss and favour to earth and the people living on it. They symbolise faith, hope, wisdom and royalty.

‘Dance Ballerina Dance’

Ths beautiful and easy to grow Iris produces brilliant lilac-pink petals with pale pink ruffled edges. The flowers stand on sturdy stems ideal for cut flower displays.

‘Beverly Sills’

This new germanica Iris produces an abundance of delicate coral-pink flowers. Paired with lance-shaped green foliage, it makes for a lovely cut display.

‘Concord Crush’

This Iris sibirica produces ruffled violet-blue flowers with a yellow centre on each petal. Their unusual markings and colour are a wonderful addition to bouquets.

JASMINE

The flower symbolises love, beauty, good luck and purity. Jasmine has always been considered a symbol of eternal beauty. In parts of India many people believe that jasmine can purify an individual, specifically when they grow into different life stages, which is why it is also symbolic of hope and spirituality. This makes it an ideal gift for a loved one, especially a partner.

Trachelospermum Pink Showers

This Star Jasmine produces delicate pink star-shaped flowers with a bright yellow centre. These blooms look dainty when clustered in a bouquet.

Nudiflorum

These bright yellow flowers are delicately small but pack a punch with their vibrant colour. They are highly fragrant and add a pop of colour to cut-flower displays.

Trachelospermum jasminoides

This highly fragrant Star Jasmine has crisp white petals and a vivid yellow centre. Due to their dainty size, they add a lovely whimsical look to bouquets.

DICENTRA

The Bleeding Heart plant symbolises speaking about your emotions, passionate love, compassion and unconditional love, and spiritual connection. This flower got its name from its peculiar appearance, so does its scientific name. Known as Dicentra Spectabilis which translates to two spectacular spurs. In literal translation it means two spurs worth looking at, which fits the flower beautifully as it really is eye-catching.

Spectabilis

This Dicentra variety produces show-stopping deep pink heart-shaped flowers, which ‘bleed’ white petals. Dicentra Spectabilis add a great splash of colour to bouquets.

Sulphur Hearts

This unique variety of Dicentra is a lovely golden yellow tipped with a soft lilac colour at the bottom. These flowers make a lovely centre point to a home-grown bouquet.

Valentine

This remarkable variety of Dicentra produces stunning red heart-shaped flowers with a white droplet hanging from the bottom. The classic shape is perfect for a Valentine.

Cut-Flower Garden Top Tips:

If space allows, dedicate a part of the garden to growing just cut flowers. The advantage of a cutting garden over picking from borders is that it avoids depleting beds and borders, as well as providing a more productive planned area for the cut flower gardener.

  • No room for a big garden? You can squeeze about 20 plants into a 3ft x 6ft raised bed.
  • Plant or sow in rows; this makes weeding, staking and picking a much easier task.
  • Pick your flowers often; the more you pick, the more flowers the plant will produce.
  • Enjoy the rewards of growing your own, personalised cut-flower displays!

Bulbs to Plant in February

Spring is usually the most popular time for planting out summer flowering bulbs. However! February is a great time to begin planting some of the hardier varieties, or for putting them out into pots and containers for a fabulous display. Generally, bulbs prefer a light, well-draining soil – so try to avoid wet and heavy soils. But don’t worry if your garden soil isn’t well-drained, as all the bulbs below are suitable for pots and containers.

LILIES

Lily bulbs can be planted any time from autumn to spring in a sunny spot, in rich well-drained soil, around 15-20cm deep. If your soil is heavy, wet or badly drained then you could plant in pots or containers for a lovely patio display.

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Lily Gran Tourismo

This deep pink oriental Lily has a striking green centre and a wonderful fragrance. This unusual giant star-shaped flower is brilliant for a cut flower display.

Martagon Hansonii

A beautiful Lily with delicate golden flowers and small burgundy markings. This flower has unusual recurved petals, making it a lovely feature.

Short Stemmed Lilies Mixed

This bright and attractive mixture will produce upright flowers that will add a splash of colour to your garden in the summer. This selection is perfect for exotic-looking pots, containers and borders.

EUCOMIS

Eucomis bulbs are usually planted in spring, however February is not too early to plant them into pots and containers. If planted in well-drained soil the bulbs should be hardy to around -6 °C . Plant the bulbs 15cm deep in pots for a summer display, or out in the border once actively growing – but only after the last frosts.

Sparkling Rosy

This extraordinary Eucomis produces contrasting deep purple and delicate pink flowers. The star-shaped blooms are accompanied by bold green foliage.

Autumnalis Alba

Our Autumnalis Alba is a more elegant Eucomis, with a refreshing colourway of crisp white flowers and bright green foliage. It makes a beautiful patio plant.

LIATRIS

Liatris are tough herbaceous perennials originating from North America, and are great for attracting wildlife such as bees and butterflies. They produce large blooms which eventually form a clump and can be later divided in spring. Plant in light, well-draining soil around 5cm deep.

Spicata

Our Liatris Spicata produces a mass of bright spike-shaped blooms in a bold purple-pink colour. The flowers stand tall at 80cm from July to September.

Spicata Alba

The Spicata Alba is a beautiful white variety of Liatris, which looks superb when complementing the pink. These blooms are wonderful for attracting bees and butterflies.

MISCELLANEOUS

Here are a few more summer-flowering beauties for you to plant NOW!

Ixia Mixed

Our fun mixture of Ixias produce wonderful candy-coloured flowers for a cheerful summer display. Their star-shaped blooms in brilliant and varied colours. 

Butterfly Gladioli Mixed

This stunning mixture of miniature Gladioli will add a splash of colour to your garden this summer. They produce delicate florets that are shaped like the wings of a butterfly. 

Decorative Dahlia Mixed

This delightfully bright and huge blooms of our Decorative Dahlia mix will bring months of joy to the summer garden. Plant in a border for an eye-catching, rainbow display.

Quick Guide to Bulb Planting:

Generally bulbs need to be planted approximately three times the depth of the bulb itself, though if you’re unsure it’s better to dig a little deeper than not.

  • Dig a hole deep and wide enough for the bulb size.
  • Place the bulb with the shoot facing upwards into the hole. Space your bulbs at least twice their width apart.
  • Fill the hole with soil and gently firm. Avoid stepping on the soil as this could cause damage.
  • After planting, water bulbs once and then regularly once in active growth.

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A Guide to the Best Begonias

Begonias are a fantastic summer plant to grow, and very rewarding. In the British climate they will flower abundantly from June right through to October. As such versatile plants they look fabulous in pots or containers on the patio, or equally as beautiful in a flower bed. At J. Parker’s we have a huge range of Begonias to add colour to your garden. Take a look below where we have compiled a few of our favourites from each variety.

Our Begonia Top Picks

DOUBLE BEGONIAS:

Double Exhibition Orange

This Exhibition Begonia has a stunningly large, zesty orange flower which is sure to add “wow” factor to beds and patio containers. The double blooms can reach a huge 15cm in diameter.

Click here to view online.

Double Exhibition White

Our White Double also reaches a giant 15cm in diameter. Its pure white petals look angelic against the fresh green foliage, and is great to mix with a brighter colour for an eye-catching display.

Click here to view online.

CASCADING BEGONIAS:

Cascading Pink

These pretty pink Cascading Begonias are a lovely addition to hanging baskets, where they will delicately trail over. A favourite of gardeners, the frilled flowers will be in bloom all summer long.

Click here to view online.

Cascading Yellow

Our yellow Cascading Begonias add vibrancy to your summer garden. They look beautiful as they spill over hanging baskets and their colourful blooms last all summer long.

Click here to view online.

FANCY FRILLS BEGONIAS (FIMBRIATA):

Fancy Frills Red

This Begonia produces luxurious large double blooms with crimped edges, in a beautiful deep crimson colour. Sat upon crisp green foliage it really is a wonderful sight.

Click here to view online.

Fancy Frills White

Our pure white Fimbriata Begonia resembles a double carnation in appearance, with its ruffled petals and serrated edges. This flower is ideal for pots, containers, and borders alike.

Click here to view online.

MIGHTY MINI BEGONIAS (SUPERBA):

Mighty Mini Superba Orange

The salmon-orange petals of this Superba Begonia add zing to borders and patio pots. These giant flowers look wonderful in the garden or make equally as beautiful cut flowers. Flower from June to October.

Click here to view online.

Mighty Mini Superba Yellow

Our Superba Yellow Begonia has giant flowers with exquisite yellow ruffled petals. Blooming all summer, from June to October, it’s sure to add delight to borders and patios.

Click here to view online.

NON STOP BEGONIAS:

Non Stop Pink

Non Stop Begonias produce fantastically vibrant flowers, and our Pink variety contrasts beautifully against its green foliage. Flowers from June right through to October.

Click here to view online.

Non Stop Salmon

Our Salmon Non Stop Begonia has bright and lively orange coloured petals which blooms virtually non-stop throughout the summer months. They are a lovely addition to pots, bedding and window boxes.

Click here to view online.

How to Grow Begonias

TUBEROUS BEGONIAS:

  • Tubers may be started into growth from February onwards. The easiest way is to put them into shallow boxes containing a mixture of loam, leaf mould and sand.
  • They should be started in shallow boxes in light soil; the saucer-like tubers should be planted very shallow with the hollow side up.
  • As soon as any danger of frost has passed they can be transferred to their position in the garden, at least 30cm apart.
  • Begonias are great lovers of moisture and during dry weather they should be water in the early morning or in the evening.

Our Spring 2020 range is out NOW! To shop our lovely collection of Spring plants and bulbs, click here.

Alternatively, you can request our Spring 2020 catalogue here.

How to Plant: Dwarf Tulips

Need advice on planting Dwarf Tulip bulbs? We’ve compiled our gardening advice in this informative blog guide on planting, arrangement, and aftercare to help make your gardening job easier.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tulips are one of the most popular Spring bulbs for a reason. Fantastic colours and attractive shapes make them a stunning choice for your garden displays. There are a wide variety of Greigii/Kaufmanniana or dwarf Tulips within our range, from First Price, Little Beauty, Humilis, and Scarlet Baby; all with stunning colourful blooms that would be perfect for any spring border, or even hanging basket, and their spectacular foliage produces year after year whilst requiring minimal care.

Planting

Tulips do not need to be planted until October in to December. Plant bulbs in well dug soil about 8-10cm deep and approx. 15cm apart. It is often beneficial to use a little bonemeal or super phosphate mixed in with the soil. Tulips delight during their growth in a sunny location.

Video

In this video tutorial, our resident gardening expert Jeff talks us through how to plant Dwarf Rockery/Botanical Tulips, with great easy to follow advice on how to achieve a terrific spring rockery display.

Aftercare

After the tulips have bloomed and when leaves fade and turn brown, the bulbs can be lifted, dried, cleaned and stored in a cool place until planting time. This allows the bulb to store more food and produce flowers the following year. Tulips should not be grown in the same soil for several years, so replace with fresh soil every other year.

Click here to view our full Tulip range!

Complete Guide: How To Plant Dahlia Tubers

Dahlias are an essential choice for the summer garden. The easy-to-grow tubers will produce a phenomenal display of colour in a range of styles with beautiful dense foliage. Dahlia work perfectly with almost all types of plants, and complement any garden wonderfully regardless of size.

Whether you’re looking to add some vibrancy to your summer, decorate your patio with impressive pot/container displays or grow a ready supply of cut flowers – Dahlias can do it all.

Why Choose Dahlias?

  1. They are easy to grow, and suitable for gardeners of all skill levels. They are fast growing by their nature and will flower in the first year and for many years to come (just keep them stored and frost free over the winter).
  2. They are versatile and will tolerate most types of well drained, fertile soil or compost. They can be grown successfully in pots, tubs, window boxes and in borders.
  3. They are one of our favourite summer bulbs because of the many different types/sizes/colours available, which all look slightly different in shape, but are all equal in beauty.
  4. Year after year sees many new exciting new varieties introduced which means once hooked on Dahlias, you will continually be able to find and try something new.
  5. They flower continuously through the summer, right up until the first frost of the autumn.
  6. They look fantastic as cut flowers and are great for lovers of something a little different.

Varieties

The main types of Dahlias available can be classified into a number of different categories, representing the main characteristics of the flower blooms themselves.

Anemone Flowering – Also known as Powder Puff Dahlias, these beauties produce unique flowers with double feathered central petals resembling a Powder Puff.

Cactus – A favourite for many years, Cactus Dahlias produce fully double pointed petals which turn backwards to create a tubular petal effect. Sometimes referred to as Spiky Dahlias, they are perfect for the border.

Dark Leaf – These Dahlias are a little different in that their foliage is not the usual green colours of most varieties. They create an abundance of flowers through the summer as expected, however the blooms appear on darker (usually purple/black) foliage.

Decorative – The largest range of large, fully double flowers with rounded petals through the summer right up until the first frosts. They produce masses of flowers for cutting purposes.

Dwarf Gallery – A range of smaller, more petite Dahlias which are perfect for the front of the border. They are prolific flowering varieties, look also great planted mixed together in pots on the patio.

Dinner Plate – As the name suggests these are the largest flowers within the range, often up to as much as 25cm in diameter (see illustration below). Try these as cut flowers and be certain to draw attention.

Pompom – Love the unusual, then these are certainly for you. Almost spherical flowers (like balls) appear through the summer. The petals have rounded tips and are curved upwards at the edges. The flower heads are also slightly flattened towards the centre.

Dahlia Tubers

All our Dahlias are supplied as top quality dormant tubers which can be planted straight into the place where they are bloom (their final location). Success rate from these dahlia tubers is extremely high and they are a relatively inexpensive way to create a large number of flowers from one tuber.

Dahlia tubers can be planted 10cm deep in fertile well drained soil, outdoors in spring when the frost has disappeared. They prefer to be in a sunny location and spaced at approximately 45cm apart. In areas where there is extreme cold, dig up dahlias and store in a cool peat over the winter. Apply a high potash fertiliser every few weeks in the summer to help growth and they can be dead headed when necessary.

How to grow Dahlia plants in pots or containers

A fantastic way to brighten up your patio is to introduce some Dahlias in pots/containers. The colour range is fantastic, with many unusual bi-colour varieties which will brighten up any space. Simply beautiful to sit back and look at during a warm summer afternoon.

  1. Once your tubers arrive safely in the post, they can be soaked overnight in a bucket of water to soak up as much moisture as possible.
  2. When all signs of frost have passed they are ready to pot up, giving plenty of time to get well established before the summer.
  3. It is recommended to place some pebbles at the bottom of the pots before adding the compost to help with drainage, by ensuring the compost doesn’t block the drainage holes.
  4. Fill in some compost and then add the tuber with the growing tip facing upwards.
  5. Continue to fill in the rest of the compost to firmly hold the tuber, making sure the growing tip at the top is peeping out and is not completely covered. This is now ready to be moved to the patio or garden area, with access to as much sun as possible.
  6. Water well after potting and then keep compost moist but not waterlogged as tubers will rot. You can add a liquid feed weekly during the growing season and provide some protection from slugs as they really love Dahlias.
  7. If growing tall varieties, insert a cane to help with growth and to keep secure.
  8. Little pruning is needed on Dahlias, however you can deadhead as flowers begin to fade.

More Dahlia Tutorials

Dwarf Gallery Dahlias

Cactus Dahlias

Bishop Dahlias

Complete Guide: How To Plant Begonia Tubers

There’s no denying that Begonias are one of the most popular and sought after flowers for the summer garden. With a beautiful and rich assortment of colours and a long flowering season, there are so many qualities to enjoy when it comes to these vibrant beauties.

Check out our guide to find out more about tubers and how to plant them, as well as a summary of our beautiful types of Begonias, so you can find a variety that best suits you and your garden’s needs.

What are Tubers?

Tubers are a thick underground part of a stem or rhizome and Begonia sizes are measured by the diameter of the tuber. Many of our varieties are supplied either as:

  • Standard size (3/4cm) – great for mass planting
  • Exhibition size (5cm+) – excellent for large flowering displays

How Do I Plant Begonia Tubers?

  • Planting Time: February – May 📆
  • Position: Full Sun/Partial Shade ☀
  • Flowering Time: June-October 🌸
  1. Start off your Begonias indoors (until all risk of frosts have passed) in a light room or greenhouse.
  2. Plant the tubers in pots with the hollow side facing up.
  3. Cover the tubers with no more than 1cm of soil or potting compost.
  4. Watered regularly during the summer, so that the soil is not allowed to dry out.
  5. Feed once every two weeks with a high potassium up until the blooms begin to fade.
  6. Lift tubers after flowering has finished and the leaves have begun to turn yellow.
  7. Store in a dry, cool (but frost-free) location over the winter. Store in soil that is only a little moist and keep this a little moist over the winter (with irregular watering) to keep the tubers from drying out.

Check out our video tutorials

How to Plant Cascading Begonias
How to Plant Cascading Begonias
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Begonia Types

Which tuber suits you? To help you get a head start on your summer planning, we’ve listed out the different types of Begonias, so you can decide which magnificent bloomer will best suit your garden.

Double Flowering
A British favourite. Their ruffled, double flower heads bloom in an array of bright colours. Perfect for summer borders and pots.

Cascading
Create a waterfall of elegance with these beautiful, trailing Begonias. Perfect for hanging baskets and patio pots.

Non-Stop
As the name suggests, these beautiful Begonias will produce masses of flowers all throughout the summer months. Great for summer baskets, pots or beds.

Superba (Mighty Mini) Our premium Superba (Mighty Mini) Begonias are a stand out for the summer garden. This colourful, compact and versatile plant is perfect for pots, hanging baskets or window boxes.

Fancy Frills (Fimbriata)
A remarkable, flamboyant Begonia. Add charm to your summer patios with these large, frilly blooms. Available in an assortment of magnificent colours.

7 Ways to Help Wildlife in your Garden

For many people, wildlife is a welcome addition to the garden, bringing a cheerful breath of life and character to your very own backyard.

It is especially vital at this time of year, in the cold frosty months, to keep supporting your local wildlife with the space you have. Taking just a little time out of your day to make some easy changes in your garden can attract a flurry of wildlife and help do your bit for the environment.

Here are seven easy ways to make it happen;

  1. Leave a snack

Food can be scarce for animals during the winter, so this time of year is the perfect time to begin attracting wildlife to your garden. Even something as simple as adding a bird feed or scattering monkey nuts on the lawn can easily attract various wildlife to your garden. A bird table is a fantastic way of enticing birds into a specific area of the garden.

  1. Choose Shrubs for shelter and food

If you have the space grow trees and big shrubs. By devoting even the smallest part of your garden to attracting wildlife you can turn it into a paradise for beneficial birds, mammals and insects.

Birds are attracted to areas where they find both food and shelter. A good way of doing so in the autumn/winter is by planting up shrubs and trees which produce berries, such as Ilex (Holly), Pyracantha or Gaultheria. Not only will they produce valuable food but they also produce some much needed ornamental value in the Winter months.

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  1. Choose nectar-rich flowers

Bees and butterflies will visit most gardens, especially if they find plants in sunny or sheltered locations. The secret here is to make available nectar rich, fragrant flowers which are colourful and from which they feed. Lavender, Buddleia, Syringa, Forsythia and Echinacea are just a few fantastic garden favourites for attracting butterflies and all look great in the garden!

Ornamental grasses are also a popular way of making the garden appealing to seed eating birds.

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  1. Don’t forget water!

Just a little water left out can help out passing critters. Remember if you have a water feature or are near bodies of water, be sure to provide water and shelter for Toads. These are great for keeping unwanted pests at bay and if you have a pond or one nearby its likely you already have Frogs and Toads living nearby. If you have a dog remember Toads will release skin secretions which are toxic to dogs.

  1. Use an old Tennis Ball

Having a space for a water feature in your garden is a fantastic way to attract wildlife, but in the colder months freezing temperatures can create lethal conditions for your pondlife. A great tip for preventing your water feature from completely freezing over is to float several old tennis balls on the surface.

  1. Offer Shelter

Critters and bugs appreciate a little homemade shelter. A pile of old logs or bricks, some overgrown grass or turned over empty pots can all help with providing shelter for animals – Hedgehogs will happily take advantage of your hospitality and thank you by eating pesky slugs and snails – an ideal natural defender of you Hosta plants! 

  1. Go Wild

Wild gardens and meadows have been popular in recent years for their stylish swathes of summer colour. Composting and letting a few patches of your garden grow a little wild will help to encourage visitors (and what gardener needs to be told the virtues of compost!).

Online now you will find many varieties of plants and shrubs which will help you along the way, by both attracting and providing food/shelter for various forms of wildlife.

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