The results are in!

2016 Environmentally Friendly and Wildlife competition results!

 

Email shot banner _ ECO! - results

 

 

We have been really impressed by the huge variety of ideas to help local wildlife and fantastic environmentally friendly ideas, tips and projects submitted to our competition over the last few months – in fact we had so many great entries that we have decided to issue an extra 10 special runner up prizes along with our six winning entrants.

 

We’ll be sharing as many of your ideas as we can here over the next few weeks, but today we have the huge pleasure of announcing the winners and sharing their ideas!

 

 

Winner

Carole Ward – with her entry about the many ways she attracts wildlife to her garden

carole-ward

 

Winner

Steve Bustin – with his entry on keeping chickens

steve-bustin

Runner up – Best Environmental Idea

Lee Hines – Environmentally friendly slug traps

lee-hines

Runner up – Best Environmental Idea

Mary Levy – Recycling food waste

mary-levy

Runner up – Best Wildlife Friendly Idea

Caroline Wimble – Wilfdlife friendly slug repelling invention

caroline-wimble

 

Runner up – Best Wildlife Friendly Idea

Rebecca Chaudhruri – Hedgehogs
rebecca-chaudhuri

 

Runners up

 

Andrew Charles Plantagenet Summers

Catherine Payne-Johnson

Chris Stephens

Irene Smith

Julian Bishop

Laura Ashworth

Marianne Robertson

Mary Cook

Peter Forest

Shelia Shaw

freebie-2

A huge congratulations to all our winners.

 

 

watch-this-space-button

 

We will be sharing lots of the amazing entries we have received over the next few weeks including those from our ten runners-up…. so keep a look out!


 

October Plant of the Month – Actea simplex (formally Cimicifuga)

Cimicifuga

(Actaea simplex)

Cimicifuga in garden

 

This plant is one of our absolute favourites and it’s easy to see why!

 

A rose by any other name…..

 

Scientists have proven that Cimicifuga are in fact from the Ranunculaceae family so should now be called Actea! Commonly known as Bugbane, you’ll probably still find these selling as Cimicifuga.

Other common names – Black Cohosh, Black Snakeroot, Fairy Candle.

 

We currently have two excellent varieties on offer.

 

Cimicifuga ramosa

Cimicifuga ramosa Atropurpurea
Each plant, when established, will throw up giant spikes up to 210 cm tall in July and August. The stems are black with racemes of stunning white flowers. A spectacular border plant with luscious bright green basal foliage. Winner of a RHS Award of Garden Merit, (see below for details).

 

POTM AGM

 

Cimicifuga Atropurpurea Brunette

Cimicifuga Atropurpurea Brunette. Luxurious dark chocolate brown-purple foliage is contrasted with beautiful white fragrant flower spikes that appear in late summer or early autumn and last for weeks. A fantastic upright habit, it can reach a height of up to 1.5m.
Luxurious dark chocolate brown-purple foliage is contrasted with beautiful white fragrant flower spikes that appear in late summer or early autumn and last for weeks. A fantastic upright habit, it can reach a height of up to 1.5m.

 

Cimicifuga, or Actaea are grown for their spectacular lush foliage, much like Hosta are, however where a Hosta’s flowers can be quite unremarkable, the rising spears of Actaea are simply stunning, with clustered racemes of dainty white flowers formed in midsummer.

Their sweet scent is a magnet for insects and they are a great source of nectar for butterflies and bees.

Companion Plants

 

Actaea really love to be planted in shade, and they are not alone! It can be quite daunting when you find yourself confronted with a North facing or shady garden, but don’t despair – there are far more shade loving plants out there than you think, including flowering varieties that will inject a bit of colour!

For more plants that are ideal for planting in shaded or North facing gardens read our article on Shade Gardening – CLICK HERE.

Planting

 

POTM October Cimicifuga

 

Cimicifuga will spread out so plant it where it has room to grow. It will thrive in cool positions, they will cope with full sun only if the soil is kept moist but well drained and not in boggy conditions. Ideally plant in full or semi shade. Make sure they are sheltered or protected from frost. This is a long lasting plant that can be slow to start and may not flower in its first year, when it does, deadhead spent flowers. Once established leave undisturbed, feed in late spring.

These are supplied as loose roots – for more information and a helpful video guide with step by step instructions on planting loose roots CLICK HERE.